Conference Speakers2018-09-14T00:08:52+00:00

NABA Conference Speakers

Keynote Speakers

Anthony Biglan (Theory)

Anthony Biglan is a Senior Scientist at Oregon Research Institute. His work focuses on comprehensive interventions that have the potential to prevent an entire range of child and adolescent problems. He is a former president of the Society for Prevention Research and was a member of the Institute of Medicine Committee on Prevention, which released its report in 2009 documenting numerous evidence-based preventive interventions that can prevent multiple problems. He has conducted research on the development and prevention of child and adolescent problem behavior for the past 35 years. His work has included studies of the risk and protective factors associated with tobacco, alcohol, and other drug use; high-risk sexual behavior; and antisocial behavior. He has conducted numerous experimental evaluations of interventions to prevent tobacco, alcohol, and other drug use, high-risk sexual behavior, antisocial behavior, and reading failure through family, school, and community-wide interventions. His book, The Nurture Effect: How the science of human behavior can improve our lives and our world, describes how behavioral science research over the past fifty years has brought us to the point where it is possible to evolve a society in which virtually every person is living a productive life in caring relationships with others.

Carl Binder (OBM)

Dr. Carl Binder is CEO of The Performance Thinking Network, LLC, and is a long-time thought leader in the field of Performance Improvement. He began his career as a student of B.F. Skinner at Harvard, and was subsequently mentored by B.H. Barrett, Eric Haughton, Ogden Lindsley, Hank Pennypacker, Bob Horn, Tom Gilbert, Joe Harless and Don Tosti, among others. He and his colleagues deliver certification programs to organizations worldwide for developing Performance Consultants, and for enabling leaders, managers and coaches to accelerate business results through the performance of their people. At the heart of Carl’s contributions to performance improvement are a plain English vocabulary and a framework for improving performance, from simple coaching sessions to complex multi-year projects, with the demonstrated potential for “changing the conversation” about performance across entire organizations. Carl received the Fred S. Keller Award from Division 25 of the American Psychological Association for early contributions to Precision Teaching and fluency-based instruction, the Thomas F. Gilbert and Lifetime Member Awards from the International Society for Performance Improvement, and the OBM Network’s Lifetime Achievement Award. He has published widely in non-behavioral journals and books, and recently learned that his 1996 paper on behavioral fluency is the 12th most cited publication in the history of The Behavior Analyst. You can learn more about Carl’s work, and download some of his publications and white papers, at www.SixBoxes.com and www.fluency.org. Contact Carl at carlbinder@sixboxes.com.

Invited Speakers

Michael Domjan (Basic)

Michael Domjan is a professor of Psychology at the University of Texas at Austin, where he has taught learning to undergraduate and graduate students since 1973. He also served as department chair from 1999 to 2005 and was the founding director of the Imaging Research Center from 2005 to 2008. Professor Domjan is noted for his functional approach to classical conditioning, which he has pursued in studies of sexual conditioning and taste aversion learning. His research was selected for a MERIT Award by the National Institutes of Mental Health as well as a Golden Fleece Award by United States Senator William Proxmire. He served as editor of the Journal of Experimental Psychology: Animal Behavior Processes for six years and continues to serve on editorial boards of various journals in the United States and other countries. He is a past president of the Pavlovian Society and also served as president of the Division of Behavioral Neuroscience and Comparative Psychology of the American Psychological Association (APA). In 2014 he received the D. O. Hebb Distinguished Scientific Contributions Award from Division 6 of APA. Domjan also enjoys playing the viola and launched the Tertis-Pavlov Project, which consists of a series of educational videos available on YouTube in which he discusses connections between his work in psychology and his interest in music.

Tim Hackenberg (Basic)

Tim Hackenberg received a B.A. degree in Psychology from the University of California, Irvine in 1982 and a doctorate in Psychology from Temple University in 1987, under the supervision of Philip Hineline.  He held a post-doctoral research position at the University of Minnesota with Travis Thompson from 1988-90.  He served on the faculty in the Behavior Analysis program at the University of Florida from 1990-2009, and is currently a Professor of Psychology at Reed College in Portland Oregon.  He has served on the Board of Directors of the Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, of the Society for the Quantitative Analysis of Behavior, as Associate Editor of the Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, as President of Division 25 of the American Psychological Association, as the Experimental Representative to the ABAI Council, and as the Director of the ABAI Science Board.  His major research interests are in the area of behavioral economics and comparative cognition, with a particular emphasis on decision-making and social behavior. In work funded by the National Science Foundation and the National Institutes of Health, he and his students have developed procedures for cross-species comparisons of behavior.

Amanda Kelly (Applied)

Dr. Amanda Kelly obtained her bachelors degree in Elementary Education, her masters of science in Behavioral Education, and her doctorate in Behavior Analysis. Dr. Kelly has experience working as a paraprofessional, a licensed teacher, a school counselor, and behavior analyst. Over the past two decades, Dr. Kelly has worked in-home settings, public and private schools, residential placements, and community settings for children and adolescents who have social-emotional, cognitive, or behavioral needs. She currently works as the Regional Clinical Training Coordinator for Positive Behavior Supports, Corp. for the Hawaiian islands. Dr. Kelly has been recognized for her dissemination and advocacy efforts. In 2012, she was awarded the “Jerry Shook Practitioner of the Year” from BABAT and in 2015, she accepted the “Advocacy Group of the Year” award from Autism Speaks, on behalf of the Hawai’i Association for Behavior Analysis (HABA). In 2017, Dr. Kelly became the first behavior analyst licensed in the state of Hawaiʻi. Dr. Kelly has served on numerous boards and committees and is currently serving as Secretary for the Hawaiʻi Disability Rights Center (HDRC) and as Legislative Chair for HABA. Dr. Kelly’s dedication and commitment in improving access to educational and medical services has resulted in numerous invited speaking engagements throughout the world, including talks in Canada, Japan, Israel, and Africa. In addition to her expertise helping families and schools, Dr. Kelly’s interests in behavior analysis extend to dissemination, organizational management, public policy, and sustainable behavior change. To learn more about Dr. Kelly and her work, please visit http://www.behaviorbabe.com.

Marianne Jackson (Applied)

Dr. Jackson received her Master’s and Doctoral Degrees in Psychology (with an emphasis in Behavior Analysis) from the University of Nevada Reno. She is currently an Associate Professor at California State University, Fresno where she serves as the director of the Master’s program in Applied Behavior Analysis. Dr. Jackson is also the clinical director of Focused Behavioral Services (FBS) at Fresno State, which encompasses Behavior Intervention Services (BIS@FS) and Social Connections (SC@FS). Research interests include the acquisition of complex social skills (including perspective taking, non literal forms of verbal behavior, and conversational skills), the motivational functions of verbal behavior, and interventions to increase health and fitness behaviors. Dr. Jackson has served on the ABAI executive council, the CalABA Board of Directors, and is an adviser to the Cambridge Center for Behavioral Studies. In 2011, she was selected as the PsiChi Faculty of the year, in 2014 was named as one of the Provost’s Outstanding New Faculty, and in 2017 received a Distinguished Faculty Service award from the College of Science and Mathematics. She regularly presents at state and national conferences and has provided teaching, training, and clinical services in the countries of Scotland, Ireland, Jordan, Bosnia, and Georgia.

Michael Levin (Theory)

Dr. Michael Levin is an associate professor in the department of psychology and the associate director of clinical training for the combined clinical/counseling psychology Ph.D. program at Utah State University. He received his Ph.D. in clinical psychology in 2013 from the University of Nevada Reno under the mentorship of Dr. Steven C. Hayes and completed his predoctoral internship at the Brown University Clinical Psychology Training Consortium. Dr. Levin’s research focuses on the use of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) delivered through web and mobile technologies to improve the efficiency, efficacy, and reach of behavioral health services. His online ACT programs have been applied to a wide range of problems including student mental health, depression, anxiety, and weight management. His research emphasizes the examination of the mechanisms of change and treatment components in ACT to further improve self-guided interventions and clinical practice more broadly. Over his career, Dr. Levin has received almost $2 million in grant funding from sources including the National Institute of Mental Health and National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health. He has published over 75 scholarly articles and chapters, primarily on ACT and online interventions. He has received awards including the Enrico E. Jones Award for Research in Psychotherapy and Clinical Psychology from the Western Psychological Association and Faculty Researcher of the Year award from the USU College of Education and Human Services.

Todd Ward (OBM)

Todd A. Ward, PhD, BCBA-D is the President and Founder of bSci21Media, LLC, which owns the top behavior analytic media outlet in the world bSci21.org. bSci21Media aims to disseminate behavior analysis to the world and to support ABA companies around the globe through the Behavioral Science in the 21st Century blog and its subsidiary services. Dr. Ward received his Ph.D. in behavior analysis from the University of Nevada, Reno under Dr. Ramona Houmanfar. He has served as a Guest Associate Editor of the Journal of Organizational Behavior Management, and as an Editorial Board member of Behavior and Social Issues. Dr. Ward has also provided ABA services to children and adults with various developmental disabilities in day centers, in-home, residential, and school settings, and previously served as Faculty Director of Behavior Analysis Online at the University of North Texas. Dr. Ward is passionate about disseminating behavior analysis to the world and growing the field through entrepreneurship. You can reach Todd at todd.ward@bsci21.org

Student Speakers

Work Shops

Shannon Biagi (Supervision)

Performance Scorecards as a Supervision & Leadership Tool
Shannon Biagi (Supervision)
Measuring and objectively evaluating supervisee performance is often a struggle for supervisors, but doing so is an ethical and professional obligation according to the BACB(R). This hands-on workshop will provide a introduction to developing individual performance scorecards to address this obligation, and will describe best practice strategies for their use as a management and leadership tool. Participants will actively develop a unique sample scorecard for their supervisees, and will learn how this can be used for evaluation and delivering feedback in their organizations and supervision practice. Beyond scorecard development, essential leadership skills for ensuring the successful implementation of a scorecard system will be emphasized in order to increase the likelihood that the scorecards will be well-received and socially-valid for supervisees.
Shannon Biagi is a Board Certified Behavior Analyst, Organizational Behavior Management (OBM) supervisor, as well as the Director of Operations for the OBM Network. Her professional experiences have spanned instructional design, training and development, performance management, large-scale pay-for-performance systems, behavioral systems analyses, and the coaching and mentoring of leaders on how to bring behavior analysis into businesses. Her company, Chief Motivating Officers LLC, is designed to help spread the science of human behavior within and beyond human service organizations through the quality supervision of upcoming behavior analysts in OBM.

Anthony Biglan

Evolving More Nurturing Communities Through Behavioral Science
Anthony Biglan
This participatory workshop will engage people in defining the kinds of environments they want–in families, schools, workplaces, neighborhoods, and communities. I will then present a public health framework for defining human well-being. The framework is based on accumulated research about the conditions that people need to thrive and the conditions that harm their development and the well-being of other people. Next, I will present a description of the PAX Good Behavior Game, which has proved successful in helping elementary schools create a nurturing culture. The PAX Good Behavior Game is a model for how we can evolve cultures that nurture the wellbeing of every person. Participants will then be asked to work in small groups to articulate how the principles and components of the PAX good behavior game could be applied to the promotion of nurturance throughout the culture – in families, neighborhoods, workplaces, and whole communities.
Anthony Biglan is a Senior Scientist at Oregon Research Institute. His work focuses on comprehensive interventions that have the potential to prevent an entire range of child and adolescent problems. He is a former president of the Society for Prevention Research and was a member of the Institute of Medicine Committee on Prevention, which released its report in 2009 documenting numerous evidence-based preventive interventions that can prevent multiple problems. He has conducted research on the development and prevention of child and adolescent problem behavior for the past 35 years. His work has included studies of the risk and protective factors associated with tobacco, alcohol, and other drug use; high-risk sexual behavior; and antisocial behavior. He has conducted numerous experimental evaluations of interventions to prevent tobacco, alcohol, and other drug use, high-risk sexual behavior, antisocial behavior, and reading failure through family, school, and community-wide interventions. His book, The Nurture Effect: How the science of human behavior can improve our lives and our world, describes how behavioral science research over the past fifty years has brought us to the point where it is possible to evolve a society in which virtually every person is living a productive life in caring relationships with others.

August (Fawna) Stockwell (Ethics)

Working with LGBTQ Clients: Cultural Competence and the BACB Ethics Code
August (Fawna) Stockwell
Transgender and gender nonconforming identities have gained increasing visibility within recent years, and gender and sexuality both play a significant role in how social interactions are constructed for people of all identities. This workshop provides an overview of key concepts and social practices related to gender and sexuality, as well as stereotypes and barriers that LGBTQ individuals face both generally and when interacting with helping professionals specifically. Attendees will explore specific strategies that behavior analysts and other helping professionals can employ to promote LGBTQ-affirming interactions with clients, their family members, staff, and others, as well as relevant BACB ethics codes that call for the development of LGBTQ cultural competence. Empirically supported literature and data will be presented where applicable and available, and questions and discussion will be welcomed throughout the workshop. Clinical scenarios and other active response opportunities will be provided.
August (Fawna) Stockwell, PhD, BCBA-D is the Founder and Director of Research and Programs at Upswing Advocates: a nonprofit organization that provides educational opportunities and community-driven research studies that support the LGBTQIA community. Over the past 10 years, their research has focused on topics including polyamory, communication in relationships, gender, sexual behavior, mindfulness, and instructional design. August has a vision of using precise measurement and an individualized approach to connect people to affirming, accessible interventions that create meaningful change. August is also the Associate Director of Research in the Applied Behavior Analysis Department at The Chicago School of Professional Psychology.